Tag Archives: casual racism

Avoiding someone because of their race, nationality or ethnicity

 

 

Episode #10: Avoiding someone because of their race, nationality or ethnicity.

This is the subtlest form of casual racism but it can be as hurtful as calling people racist names. Avoiding somebody can make them feel as if they don’t belong in Australia.

Casual Racism_10_avoiding race

When someone’s offended you tell them to “take a joke.”

  Episode #9: When someone’s offended you tell them to “take a joke”.

 With Australia’s laid back culture, it’s easy to dismiss those offended as uptight people who ‘can’t take a joke’. This often masks the real meaning behind what is said, or intended. The backlash of pointing out that a ‘joke’ is racist can lead to accusations of not being ‘Aussie’ enough. Being light-hearted does not mean accepting racism. Indeed, being Aussie means accepting and enjoying the multi-ethnic diversity of the culture of migrants that make up the modern Australian landscape.Casual Racism_9_joke (1)

You cross the road to avoid people of a certain race

Episode #6: You cross the road to avoid people of a certain race.

Refer to episode #5 for further explanation, however this episode appears pretty self-explanatory. This is a high level of casual racism, and is very explicit in how someone will hold discriminatory views against someone else purely based on race, culture, or religion.

Casual Racism_6_Avoidance

“But where are you really from?”

Episode #4: “Yes, but where are you really from?”

Here continues our series of “10 signs you might be casually racist”: in this episode we hear about one of the most casual, and seemingly innocent questions can have deep racial connotations.

 

Casual Racism_4_home (2)

The reason the question “but where are you really from?” is racist is due to the history of immigration and naturalization in Australia. There is a myth about the Anglo-saxon as the true native of Australia, therefore, the true Australian. Everyone but the British were intentionally kept out with strict planned migration. This changed when the Great Depression (1930s) and Second World War (1939-1945) lead to high death rates and low birth rates, and slowed migration.
In the end Europeans were encouraged to come, many of them being DPs (Displaced Peoples) from the War. Those from other countries in Asia, the Pacific, Americas (unless of European heritage), Africa and the Caribbean (even those they were British subjects or citizens) were still barred from emigrating to Australia.

Anyone not found to be European (with favour towards Baltic states and Northern Europeans) was classified as an “alien” amongst legal and political terminology. While these were attitudes that ended 40 years ago, they are still in the very recent history of Australian society and therefore, still find their ideas (even subconsciously) within the psyche of the nation.

If you would like to read more about the issue we suggest White Nation by Ghassan Hage, Orientalism by Edward Said, and any book on Australian immigration by James Jupp.

“I’m not racist. I have black friends.”

Coming from our blog last year about “10 signs you might be a casual racist” we have designed some easy to use step-by-step infographics you can use and share around. Here is part 2 of the new visual series:

Episode #2: “I’m not racist. I have black friends.”

You can catch up on Episode #1 here.

Casual Racism_2_Friends (2)

I’m Not Racist, but…

Coming from our blog last year about “10 signs you might be a casual racist” we have designed some easy to use step-by-step infographics you can use and share around. Here is part 1 of the new visual series:

Episode #1: “I’m not racist, but…”

Casual Racism_1_Racist