Monthly Archives: August 2015

Avoiding someone because of their race, nationality or ethnicity

    Episode #10: Avoiding someone because of their race, nationality or ethnicity. This is the subtlest form of casual racism but it can be as hurtful as calling people racist names. Avoiding somebody can make them feel as if they don’t belong in Australia.

When someone’s offended you tell them to “take a joke.”

  Episode #9: When someone’s offended you tell them to “take a joke”.  With Australia’s laid back culture, it’s easy to dismiss those offended as uptight people who ‘can’t take a joke’. This often masks the real meaning behind what is said, or intended. The backlash of pointing out that a ‘joke’ is racist can lead

You are more offended by “reverse-racism”

Episode #8: You are more offended by “reverse-racism” All Together Now maintains the standard that racism can effect anybody and everybody of all cultural, national and religious backgrounds. If you take a close look at the Australian planned immigration history, it is obvious that not everybody (even within Europe) was on the same racial standing

You don’t see colour just the human race

Episode #7: You don’t see colour just the human race Being colour-blind can be a way to avoid the issue of discussing racism. This only increases the issues rather then getting rid of racism.  

You cross the road to avoid people of a certain race

Episode #6: You cross the road to avoid people of a certain race. Refer to episode #5 for further explanation, however this episode appears pretty self-explanatory. This is a high level of casual racism, and is very explicit in how someone will hold discriminatory views against someone else purely based on race, culture, or religion.

You get nervous around Muslims/Hindus on airplanes

Episode #5: You get nervous around Muslims/Hindus on airplanes. The fifth episode in our individualized “10 signs you might be casually racist” really targets an ‘elephant in the room’ point about the rising attitudes towards the Muslims within Australian society. There has been a large rise in anti-Islamic sentiments within Australia, with 25% (Scanlon Report