: Interviews

Proud to introduce our Star Volunteer : Deliana Lacoban !

Every second month, All Together Now awards one of its volunteers with the “Star Volunteer” award. This time around, our Star Volunteer is Deliana Lacoban.

Deliana’s role at All Together Now is to monitor the mainstream media and make note of how specific news outlets report on race. To our knowledge, the work Deliana is doing has never been done in Australia before, and this presents particular challenges as Deliana needs to adjust her approach as she works.

Deliana decided to volunteer at All Together Now because the organisation reflects her values and the issues she is passionate about. Deliana has studied discrimination and race at university for the past few years, and recently decided that she wants to do something about these issues.

On volunteering at All Together Now, Deliana says “I like the feeling that we’re doing something that matters. But I’m also surprised in a negative way to know that what we’re doing here hasn’t been done before.

“I also like the flexibility and the fact that I can bring my experience and expertise to what I’m doing. And working in a team – it’s great that we all listen to each other.”

If you’d like to join Deliana and volunteer at All Together Now, please email your CV to [email protected] and let us know what type of roles you are interested in.

The Secret River and the Power of the Arts

I’ve seen the power of the arts to move, to educate, drive change and foster social cohesion many times. I experienced it intensely first hand, when I produced Crossings: Songs from the East in 2013.

The concert showcased a cross-cultural collaboration of traditional and improvised music spanning the Greek, Kurdish, Arabic and Persian traditions. It was an exciting coming-together for the first time of local Sydney-based musicians; four out of the five were first generation Australians from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. They drew from both their musical heritage and their contemporary experience of multicultural Australia.

The audience, which we surveyed, said things like:

“Beautiful to see a coming together of cultures through the arts”…

“Brought back memories of home”…

“Wonderful! Especially watching the musicians improvising – working together… so much richness (and they say multiculturalism doesn’t work)! It is alive and brings so much richness to our lives and to Australia”…

The experience of that production impacted all involved, from the artists to the audience and everyone in between, in ways that only arts and cultural experiences can sometimes – on the level where words cease and only the senses and the human spirit exist. One comes away from an experience like that with a sense that something in them is a little different… a little changed.

As an audience member watching the Sydney Theatre Company’s latest production of The Secret River, I came away with exactly that feeling. I was shattered at the brutality of the story – the brutal truth in the story – but I was compelled to watch and listen.

I felt like I was bearing witness to a history not told often enough. In the author, Kate Grenville’s, words: “This book isn’t history, but it’s solidly based on history. Most of the events in the book “really happened” and much of the dialogue is what people really said or wrote.” Knowing this, I felt the weight of responsibility, like I was almost charged with the duty of carrying this history on, of re-telling it. So I made it my mission for days afterwards to tell everyone I met to go see the show.

It was hard to watch at times. The woman sitting to my left had her eyes closed for much of the massacre scene. It wasn’t explicit or visually disturbing – but it sat in that space – the space where words cease and only the senses exist. Clearly for the woman beside me, her senses were in overwhelm. I was grateful that the night I attended happened to be followed by the Q and A session with the actors and co-director afterwards – it was an opportunity for the audience to re-compose and debrief almost. More than that, it was a way to bring the savage racism of our history into the present.

The discussion that ensued was open and honest. The actors told of their own experiences of facing and witnessing racism today. Actor Ningali Lawford-Wolf told of how she was refused a ride by four taxi drivers on the street just outside the theatre. Richard Piper, who played the most savage of the white characters, talked of how the experience of being a part of this production changed him – made him reflect on times where he had been a bystander to racist incidences and had not acted. He spoke of the need for us all to speak up and take a stand in similar situations, and of his resolve to do differently next time. An audience member asked the questions: “What can we do? How can we do better when we leave this theatre?”. One of the younger cast members, Madeleine Madden, spoke about the power of the arts to move and affect change. Everyone on stage seemed to acknowledge a sort of shared social responsibility to tell the story with authenticity and sensitivity.

I came away with the feeling that the sentiment in that Q and A session was shared company-wide, and with 2 mins of online research I discovered the Sydney Theatre Company’s ‘Human Rights and Social Performance Statement’ As part of STC’s commitment to “operating as a responsible organisation” they state: “STC’s statement on Human Rights and Social Performance reflect our ability to uphold human rights within our organisation and our sphere of influence. We adhere to both international and local human rights legislation and reflect these in our human resources policies, practices and Code of Conduct.” Further down, in relation to audiences and the arts industry, it states: “We share our learning and promote human rights issues through giving voice to social issues by our choices in productions and our industry networks by contributing to conversations.”

This initiative – of writing the importance of social responsibility into the policies and strategic objectives of an organisation – is exactly what we need more of – especially in the arts and cultural industries, whose core ‘business’ is in the creation of meaning.

Go and see The Secret River if you can. Or read the book. Or watch the TV series. And share the story. Continue the conversation. It is our shared responsibility.

Review by Kiriaki Koubaroulis

 

Interview with All Together Now Chairperson: Kylie O’Reilly

Kylie O’Reilly is the Managing Director of the Agency Division for Australian Associated Press (AAP), the national news agency of Australia. Kylie has over 15 years’ experience in the media industry and holds an MBA from the University of Technology Sydney.

Kylie has been the Chairperson of All Together Now for some years, helping to lead the organisation through to some great achievements.

We now interview her about her role in the organisation, her passions and goals before she heads off to run in the Blackmores Sydney Running Festival, this Sunday 20th September, 2015.

 

All Together Now: You can be a role model of modern woman. Many girls in Australia can take you as an example, how to be successful in life. Can you tell me what story is hidden behind your decision to refocus from Managing Director at AD AAP to the role of a chairperson in not-for-profit organization? Why did you choose anti-racism focus?

Kylie O’Reilly: Firstly, the reason, why I chose to contribute my time as a chairperson to All Together Now, was because I want to do something to make a difference. So, for me was important to be sure, that I can contribute my skills into their work, make a difference into the community. But the most important driver was an ability to participate. My previous experience was very much commercial and corporate, and it’s great, it’s nice to help businesses to make money and to employ people. But, when it gets down to having children and to be a part of a family and a community, I realized that I want to see my children living in a better place. That’s why I chose All Together Now. And I thought, that one of these topics (racism) would be committed to, because it is a hard work, [and] it is not an easy thing to be part of it. It’s not one of the topics, which everyone would easily contribute to, such as animals’ rights, cancer or children, – it is much tougher. As for me, I like challenges and being able to contribute to the good.

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ATN: Kylie, if you could compare from the perspective of racial discrimination Australia of your childhood and Australia today, what differences can you list?

Kylie O’Reilly: I think, nowadays we are much more aware. There are two major things. First of all, when I grew up it was a very white Australia, where I was. Australia wasn’t so multicultural. I spent my childhood on the Northern beaches of Sydney and it was a very Anglo-Saxon place. Now, when we are near the beaches it is much more multicultural. I can see that children integrate much more in classes. They ask questions about different religions, different customs and many other things. As a child, I didn’t have any of that. So, I see differences in all of these things that were changed since the time of 30 years ago till now.

I would say that modern Australia is much more integrated. People are more aware now about dangers of racial discrimination. I don’t think that 30 years ago we did understand the impact of racial discrimination, how is it felt like to be an excluded outsider to someone new to the country. Nowadays we are totally aware how harmful that is. So, I think, Australia became very different in that sense.

 

ATN: As a mother, how do you explain and will explain multicultural differences and diversity to your children? Is it possible to erase racism from Australian society in future, educating a new generation today?

Kylie O’Reilly: Yes, I believe so. I have always believed that it’s possible, because I believe in the strength of acceptance and love. So, for me, why would not I accept everybody’s differences, we are all similar human beings with a heart and a brain…You know, it’s just because you look differently and speak differently to me, it doesn’t mean that we are that different from each other. All these differences are things which need to be celebrated. So, as for me, I will teach my children about it: differences make us unique, there are many things that we should celebrate and be curious about, [and] learn more about. All these things make the world so interesting, [like] when we are travelling, doesn’t it? We get to learn about different cultures and different places, we can learn different things and taste different food and we can immerse ourselves [in] something completely unknown.

 

ATN: Apart from being a chairperson of All Together Now how do you oppose racism in everyday life?

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Kylie O’Reilly: I would say that the first level of racism, that I would see, is joke. People are making jokes. What they think is a joke in the reality is a statement. Basically, it is framing of our culture into a joke. So, for me, I would say that joke is a way of framing the culture. I don’t think that it is much more diverse in that. In everyday living we can frequently hear jokes about Asian drivers or…you know, when people say those kinds of things. To me that is a crazy talk, because I am not my one culture, you are not your one culture. Same as it doesn’t mean that I am a great driver or a bad driver, just because I am a female. For me this is much more complicated now. So, in everyday life racism usually appears in those kinds of comments and inappropriate jokes. Me as a person would stand up and say something about that. And I would try to educate people, why that’s not appropriate.

ATN: It is great to hear you are so active Kylie. Thank you for having this attitude. .

Kylie O’Reilly: It’s the way to be, isn’t it?

ATN: This shows the strength of your character. Not everyone is brave enough to speak up and be opposite to racism.

Kylie O’Reilly: I think, what you can do is to deliver your thoughts through the humor. It doesn’t have to be controversial. It doesn’t have to become confrontational. If I’ll deliver it with actual curiosity and humor, when I say to you: “Why do you say that”? It is not threatening, isn’t it? So, if I can deliver it in non-threatening way, sometimes it can be educational. I think this is what people struggle with sometimes: how to communicate to another person if anything is inappropriate.

 

ATN: How do you see Australia in 20 years?

Kylie O’Reilly: My vision for Australia in 20 years would be that it’s much more embracing and has different cultural identities. It gets down to a couple of values instead of identities. I would like to think that my children will have multiple kinds of friends of different color, different races and different backgrounds and that’s generally accepted as we become more global. So, that’s what I would like to see in the future. I don’t want to see an Australia where everything is only Anglo and white. In this case we would be very limited and especially in terms of Australian values. So, for me diversity is the way to go.

 

ATN: Could you, please, share your plans for the future? What projects do you want to realize?

Kylie O’Reilly: Well, my job as a chairperson is to help forming a strategy together with the managing director and a board. Talking on behalf of the board, we are very committed to educating and standing up against racism through education. So, I am very excited about the projects that are useful for children and for teachers. I can comment that they are really great projects to be involved in, because putting yourself in the shoes of somebody else can educate you more as it is like to be a victim of racism. And once you have some empathy to that situation, it helps you to understand more, you are even able to curiously challenge people on their views. So, as for me, I love that project.

I also like how we are associated with sport. It is important, because there is a lot of racism in sport. Sport is a one avenue where people can really embrace each other and come together with the common goal of going to their teams. And I think that to be a part of this and to generate an awareness of All Together Now is really important.

So, our projects are connected with everything that can be put on a plate for educating and helping people to stand up against racism. As an example, we created educational mobile application. And on the other side we would like to associate with sport.

Interview with Andy Trieu

We caught up with our Ambassador Andy Trieu, co-host of PopAsia on SBS2, ahead of his run at the Blackmore’s Running Festival, 20th September, to speak about his passions, racism, and the changing dynamics in Australia’s television and film industry.

 

All Together Now: First of all, thank you for the opportunity to talk to you and share your experience with all people who are not indifferent to racial problems in Australia.

What helps you to be an Australian actor and at the same time to maintain your historical roots? What difficulties do you face representing Kung Fu Martial Arts culture? Why did you start to master in Kung Fu? Can you tell what story lies behind this passion?

Andy: First of all, I would say that the thing which helps me to maintain my Kung Fu skills is staying in the industry and acting. Kung Fu is my personal drive, such as being inspired by others. Also I am quite competitive. And, so I like to stay competitive with other opponents in Martial arts. And I keep my drive there. And work keeps me routed to my cultural background. My parents are also keep me linked to my culture. I am Vietnamese, but I was born here. So, my parents want me to keep my cultural heritage somehow. It’s my parents really keep me grounded in some way. I love doing Martial Arts and spreading Asian culture in different ways, because Kung Fu and Martial Arts in general are related to Asian culture. Though, to continue doing that, performing Martial Arts in TV shows, in movies is a really cool way to spread Asian culture in some way or form.

 

ATN: Although Australia is a multicultural country, but there is still a huge problem with racism in schools. When you were a student how did you solve this problem for yourself?

Andy: To answer to the first part of the question about how did I deal with racism at school when I was a kid, I would like to say, that first of all, being from Asian background  I hung out with more Asians. I think it was because I felt safer in with them as I had a feeling of belonging to them. And when I didn’t have people of similar cultural background, the way how I dealt with that was to keep it to myself until I was more confident to say something about it. And it was only later on. And I used to tell myself that if they said something racist, [then] they are, probably, not educated about that. They just don’t know. So, my way to deal with racism was having acceptance and knowing that things will get better.

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ATN: Was it hard to make friends in this racially diverse atmosphere?

Andy: Some people thought that it was cool to have an Asian friend at that time, so I guess, it wasn’t too difficult. But, of course, when I made friends with people from other Asian cultures, it was fine, it was quite easy. I think, it comes down to your personality sometimes. And even if someone would say something racist, I guess, it is not about being hurt, it is more being positive about it, and all things would be better.

 

ATN: Now you are a popular media figure. You are the role-model for many teenagers and young adults from with South-East Asian heritage. How do you provide the mature attitude to multicultural diversity through your participation in TV shows? Is that a priority for you?

Andy: Yes, definitely, it is a priority for me. A lot of my Asian actor-friends and Asian people in media industry believe that the more [Asian actors in the industry] the more [the wider-Australian public will] say that “it’s Ok to have Asian faces on TV”. So, I think that the more we do work in TV, the more it becomes acceptable to have multiculturalism in TV shows and things like that.

 

ATN: You are so active and enthusiastic in your social and professional life. What is your secret?

Andy: I guess, what motivates me everyday is having my personal goals. For example, I really want to make a difference and achieve. When you once have achieved something, at the next stage you want to achieve more. I think that to work hard is a fun to me in its special form.

 

ATN: But when you get up in the morning, open your eyes and understand: I want to achieve this today,- what makes you motivated?

Andy: Oh, I am gonna say, that I am quite competitive, and I really like to win and to make a difference in some way or form. I believe that, probably, I am not the most talented, but I want to be the most hardworking in my field. I also think that it is important to get more Asian faces in TV. In order to be in this field, you need to work hard, really hard, and to be more dedicated. And as I’ve been doing Martial arts and working in TV industry for so long, around 6-7 years now, I feel that I am getting closer to where I want to be. Thus, I understand, that at this stage I need to work harder and don’t let it go. So, this is my motivation.

 

ATN: Why did you join ‘All Together Now’?

Andy: First of all, because I personally understand how it feels, as I [have] experienced racism before. I also feel, that there are not enough Asian faces represented as much. When something connected with racism happens, what do people do? Who is going to stand up for you? Who represents that? It was important for me to find an avenue to that. So, I found ‘All Together Now’ and I am ready to tell about this issue.

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ATN: What opportunities did friendship with people from diverse ethnic backgrounds open to you? How does it enrich your life?

Andy: This enriches my life so much! All my friends from multicultural background, say like Russian, Asian… They teach me so many new things like food, culture, martial arts, different movies and just everything that enriches my life more and more. Now I feel that dipping your hands in different cultures makes your life worth while.

Interview with Suren Jayemanne

Last week, we caught up with Suren Jayemanne, an up-and-coming comedian from Melbourne. He has been a practising comedian for the last four years, and has participated in major events such as the Melbourne Festival’s Comedy Zone. He now lives in Sydney, where he recently participated in the Sydney Comedy Festival to sold-out shows.

Critics have raved about his work, with The Weekly Review describing him as ‘a purveyor of truly magnificent puns’. SBS have also said that ‘He’s charming and engaging, carefully blending the topical with the ridiculous.’ Unlike other comedians, Suren has a unique perspective on multiculturalism and racism, having grown up in Melbourne but with Sri Lankan and Malaysian parents – he brings to light his experiences in his comedy, using humour to convey powerful insights into the nature of his experience.

Check out our interview with Suren Jayemanne below:

Or, if you’re having trouble hearing the audio, you can read a copy of our interview with Suren Jayemanne. For more information about Suren, and to keep up with his latest news, follow him on Twitter at @JayEManne or subscribe to his Facebook page.

If you enjoyed this interview, be sure to check out our interview with Jen Carnovale (audio and transcript)


TRANSCRIPT:

All Together Now: Thank you for speaking with me Suren. So, the first question I have is how did you come to be a comedian?

Suren Jayemanne: I guess it kind of started by watching a lot of comedy. I used to watch the big Melbourne comedy festival galas on TV every year and from that, I went to go see shows at the festivals when I learned that there was more than just the gala and then I eventually kind of decided… like, I’d look around the room and see everyone laughing and I was like ‘Oh I want to try and do that’… And then I tried and now it’s been four years and yeah it’s been fun.

All Together Now: And in what ways do you think your work brings a new dimension to Australia’s comedy scene?

Suren Jayemanne: It’s pretty interesting I think because (pause) as I’ve said I’ve been doing it for about four years, I started out just doing jokes that came to me that I found funny, it’s a lot of wordplay, a lot of shorter jokes and now that I’ve got a little bit more experience, like I’ve still got a long way to go I guess, but I’m starting to feel a lot more confident on stage and I’m starting to talk more about sort of personal things, the way I see the world in light of my cultural background and how that kind of fits in with growing up in Australia so I think… The dimension that I have that is a little bit different is… You know, having been born in Australia but with a multicultural background, my parents are from Malaysia and Sri Lanka but I grew up in a time when there weren’t many Sri Lankan kids in the suburb that I grew up in, there weren’t a lot of Indian students starting to come to Australia yet. I was almost raised as just another white kid. There’s a lot of comedians that grew up in a community and they talk about their ethnic background, their role in the community whereas there’s a few people with a similar voice to me but I think its interesting the perspective of kind of growing up almost in between two cultures and wanting to find out more about both cultures… if that makes sense.

All Together Now: No, that’s amazing! How do you think comedy can be used as a tool for social change, changing people’s perspectives?

Suren Jayemanne: I sort of go back and forth on this issue a bit. Sometimes I get really inspired and feel that comedy is a really powerful tool in, at the very least, bringing to the fore issues and making people aware of issues. And then sometimes I go back and think ‘Oh no, at the end of the day it should just be entertainment, just trying to make people laugh.’ I think realistically, it probably sits somewhere in between, like the best comedians are the people that, for them, it’s not too serious, it’s kind of lighthearted but they do make you think. I think race and gender issues, those types of things, comedians have the ability to… they’re not being checked or censored by any… they don’t have to worry about who they’re working for, they’re working for themselves so they don’t have to be accountable – although to some extent there is accountability. For example, you’ve come to interview me at my work, my day job is as an accountant so there’s lots of disclaimers in this conversation so I’m very measured. If you had come to talk to me after a gig I might have been in my comedy mindset and told you a different answer. But I think comedy shouldn’t take itself too seriously and if it can laugh at itself, it can also be quite powerful in at least bringing issues to the fore.

Interview with Jen Carnovale

All Together Now caught up, in an interview, with Jen Carnovale ahead of her appearance at the organisation’s 5th Anniversary event to let us know the background to her comedy work and why she is able to discuss topics like racism in a funny, receptive and easy manner with her audience.

Who is Jen Carnovale?

Jen Carnovale has been on the comedic circuit for  5 years now and has made a big splash for herself locally and abroad. Jen has won numerous awards for her comedy including; Best Newcomer, Sydney Comedy Festival 2010. Jen Carnovale’s style is like a hysterical casual conversation that you cannot turn away from. You get immersed in her stories and crazy situations. The Australian stage said Jen is “[g]ifted with wonderful timing and lovely line in accents.” Jen will recently performed at both the Melbourne and Sydney Comedy Festivals and will be heading off the the Edinburgh Comedy Fringe Festival in August, 2015.

 

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Interview transcript is available here.

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