: Infographic

A Brief History of Multiculturalism

a-brief-history-of-multiculturalism
Creative Commons License
A Brief History of Multiculturalism by All Together Now is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.You are welcome to download (PDF) and print this infographic providing you observe this license.
The Galbally Report,1988; The Fitzgerald Report,1988; Leuner, Multiculturalism and Language Maintenance in Australia; Unpublished work N.B. Longhurst “Assimilation to Multiculturalism: The Continuity of Cultural Performance 1950-1988”.

All Together Now is a not-for-profit organisation. If you have found this infographic useful, please make a donation of $25 to help us continue to create more like this one.

Australia, still in denial?

Australia’s acknowledgement of racism has grown considerably, since Adam Goodes was Australian of the Year (2014). This could be largely due to the fact that his cause was anti-racism. The Racism. It Stops With Me. campaign was launched soon after. Over 250 organisations joined the anti-racism campaign, which promoted racial equality (including All Together Now). It seemed that Australia was finally ready to kick racism out of the country once and for all.  However, it seemed in 2015, Australia once again took a step back as it questioned incidents of racism as actually being racist or not. The questioning of an incident being racist or not was seen most prominently during the booing bullying of AFL player Adam Goodes. People in the media questioned the validity of the incessant and constant targeted bullying, of this particular player, as being racist or not. It was undoubtedly fueled by racism, as the ‘issue’ that had people begin the booing of Goodes occurred after he displayed (during the Indigenous Round of AFL) an Indigenous symbol to the crowd as a victory showcase after scoring a goal. Idiotic though it may seem, racism is often just so.

We’d like to take the time to add to the discussion on Goodes, that being ‘politically correct’ is giving respect. It is the correct way to act. Denying respect includes denying racism. Or, as Marlon James put it, “most of us are non-racists” and are content to be so: “I won’t, I don’t, I’ve never” are not statements that change those individuals, groups or institutions that are prejudice, bigoted and racist. This ‘non-racism’ occurs when you know something is racist but by doing nothing it does not stop it from occurring. The question the comes to: How do we make active people trying to end racism?

We make active people trying to end racism by giving them knowledge of how it acts, interacts and attacks society and individuals ability to succeed, be unified and progress.

Non-racism along with racism denial are two important factors in the continuing of racism in Australia and internationally. So, here is a reminder of what racism denial looks like:

 

Racism Denial 2016 (Conflict Copy) (1)

You get nervous around Muslims/Hindus on airplanes

Episode #5: You get nervous around Muslims/Hindus on airplanes.

The fifth episode in our individualized “10 signs you might be casually racist” really targets an ‘elephant in the room’ point about the rising attitudes towards the Muslims within Australian society. There has been a large rise in anti-Islamic sentiments within Australia, with 25% (Scanlon Report 2014) of people feeling negatively towards the Muslim population. Hindus and Sikhs often suffer the same discrimination, as the perpetrator of the racism assumes, based on visual appearance alone, that the person they have targeted is Muslim; they, then, receive the same taunts and abuse.

If you see anyone being racially attacked you can speak up, take evidence and assist the victim by going with them to report it, and providing your evidence as proof of the incident. Any incidents have are also being reported to the Islamophobia Register Australia.
Casual Racism_5_Muslims

“But where are you really from?”

Episode #4: “Yes, but where are you really from?”

Here continues our series of “10 signs you might be casually racist”: in this episode we hear about one of the most casual, and seemingly innocent questions can have deep racial connotations.

 

Casual Racism_4_home (2)

The reason the question “but where are you really from?” is racist is due to the history of immigration and naturalization in Australia. There is a myth about the Anglo-saxon as the true native of Australia, therefore, the true Australian. Everyone but the British were intentionally kept out with strict planned migration. This changed when the Great Depression (1930s) and Second World War (1939-1945) lead to high death rates and low birth rates, and slowed migration.
In the end Europeans were encouraged to come, many of them being DPs (Displaced Peoples) from the War. Those from other countries in Asia, the Pacific, Americas (unless of European heritage), Africa and the Caribbean (even those they were British subjects or citizens) were still barred from emigrating to Australia.

Anyone not found to be European (with favour towards Baltic states and Northern Europeans) was classified as an “alien” amongst legal and political terminology. While these were attitudes that ended 40 years ago, they are still in the very recent history of Australian society and therefore, still find their ideas (even subconsciously) within the psyche of the nation.

If you would like to read more about the issue we suggest White Nation by Ghassan Hage, Orientalism by Edward Said, and any book on Australian immigration by James Jupp.

“You speak so well for an Asian.”

Here is part 3 of the new visual series based from our popular blog last year about “10 signs you might be a casual racist” . We have designed some easy to use and share infographics on each of the 10 signs of casual racism.

You can catch up on Episode #1  and Episode #2 here.

Episode #3: “You speak so well for an Asian.”

Casual Racism_3_Speech

“I’m not racist. I have black friends.”

Coming from our blog last year about “10 signs you might be a casual racist” we have designed some easy to use step-by-step infographics you can use and share around. Here is part 2 of the new visual series:

Episode #2: “I’m not racist. I have black friends.”

You can catch up on Episode #1 here.

Casual Racism_2_Friends (2)