: ATN news

Who Watches The Media?

New research conducted by All Together Now and University of Technology Sydney has found that 62 opinion based reports potentially breached at least one of the media Codes of Conduct due to racism. 

The full research findings are available at alltogethernow.org.au/media-monitoring.

Priscilla Brice, the Managing Director of not-for-profit organisation All Together Now said, “Among the publications we tracked during this six-month study, negative portrayals of race were most frequently published on News Corp’s online newspapers Daily Telegraph, The Australian and Herald-Sun.”

The research conducted between January to July this year, found that Muslims were mentioned in more than half of the opinion pieces, and more than twice as many times as any other single group mentioned. Of these, 63% of reports about Muslims were framed negatively.

“Anecdotally, we know that negative portrayals of Muslims in the media is having adverse effects in communities, with Muslim families (and particularly women wearing hijab or other head coverings) being victimised. All Together Now’s research provides data to show that of the highest-rated news outlets, News Corp is the primary perpetrator. News Corp has a lot of work to do to improve their editorial policies to ensure their journalists don’t target people based on their race, nationality, religion or other cultural attributes.”

The study focused on opinion-based articles published by the four most-watched current affairs TV programs, and the four most-read newspapers nationally, as determined by ratings agencies.

Currently, under some media regulations, audiences have only thirty days in which to make a complaint. The research report recommends that this deadline be removed to allow audiences to make complaints about racist media content at any time, and for the definition of racism be broadened in the Codes of Conduct to include covert forms of racism.

It also recommends that news agencies support journalists to discuss race sensitively. They can do this by providing training, recruiting more journalists of colour, and ensuring that their editorial policies are racially aware.

The full research findings are available at alltogethernow.org.au/media-monitoring.

Ngaiire, L-FRESH The LION, Thandi Phoenix and more to play Rock Against Racism

IMPORTANT! Please note that this gig has been postponed until Thursday 22 March 2018.

All Together Now is proud to present our first Rock Against Racism gig in Sydney. This music event will take place on the 7th of December at Manning Bar in Camperdown, NSW from 8:00 p.m.

Sydney’s soulful NGAIIRE will be joined at Rock Against Racism by YouTube Creators for Change alumni L-FRESH The LION, who is tackling systemic racism head-on in his Tribeca Film Festival debuted single Raci$t/Our World. The rest of the night will be in the capable and very talented hands of hip hop artist BWISE, captivating songstress THANDI PHOENIX and outspoken Indigenous rapper KAYLAH TRUTH.

2017 has been a polarising year for the topic of identity and race in Australia. With a range of views cutting through the media, Rock Against Racism is designed to bring the national conversation out of the shadows and to provide a safe space that inspires more people to speak out.

“We believe everybody needs to have a good understanding of what racism is so that they feel empowered to act when they witness it, and we know music can be so powerful in that respect,” said Priscilla Brice, All Together Now’s Managing Director. “One in five Australians experienced racism over the past year, and we know from research that one way to reduce this statistic is by all of us challenging racism wherever it occurs.”

Rock Against Racism will take place on December 7th at Sydney’s Manning Bar with an incredible line-up of passionate artists who have maintained a brave stance on the subject.

Rock Against Racism is organised by All Together Now with support from Multicultural NSW and TheMusic.com.au. Funding for Rock Against Racism has been provided by the NSW government.

Tickets are $35 and available now from the Manning Bar and Oztix.

IDEA … MONTHLY MYSTERY BOOK BOX

All Together Now volunteers are always coming up with new ideas on how to educate more people about racial equality. One idea we’ve come up with recently is a Monthly Mystery Book Box (or MMBB for short), which is a spin on our monthly book club.

According to the University of Western Sydney’s Challenging racism project national survey, 76% of people expressed a commitment to personally challenge racism. If you’re one of these people, this MMBB is for you. Every month, we’ll send you a mystery book about the experiences of migration, racism, belonging, and related topics. Most books will be written within the past three years by Aboriginal people and people of colour based in Australia.

Please let us know your opinion about this Monthly Mystery Book Box idea. Do you love it or hate it? Would you subscribe? Do you have your own ideas that build on this concept? Please let us know at [email protected] – we’d love to hear from you!

Proud to introduce our Star Volunteer : Deliana Lacoban !

Every second month, All Together Now awards one of its volunteers with the “Star Volunteer” award. This time around, our Star Volunteer is Deliana Lacoban.

Deliana’s role at All Together Now is to monitor the mainstream media and make note of how specific news outlets report on race. To our knowledge, the work Deliana is doing has never been done in Australia before, and this presents particular challenges as Deliana needs to adjust her approach as she works.

Deliana decided to volunteer at All Together Now because the organisation reflects her values and the issues she is passionate about. Deliana has studied discrimination and race at university for the past few years, and recently decided that she wants to do something about these issues.

On volunteering at All Together Now, Deliana says “I like the feeling that we’re doing something that matters. But I’m also surprised in a negative way to know that what we’re doing here hasn’t been done before.

“I also like the flexibility and the fact that I can bring my experience and expertise to what I’m doing. And working in a team – it’s great that we all listen to each other.”

If you’d like to join Deliana and volunteer at All Together Now, please email your CV to [email protected] and let us know what type of roles you are interested in.

There’s nothing casual about casual racism

Cosmo article imageCosmopolitan magazine published an article about casual racism in the October issue of their magazine (which is no longer on sale).

If you missed it, you can download a copy of the article (PDF) thanks to Cosmo!

The article features our Everyday Racism app as a solution to teaching people how to speak up against racism.

The Tribe

posted by Kiriaki Koubaroulis

 

Last Sunday I went to the theatre. It was a show that had caught my attention earlier in the week in my Facebook feed. Urban Theatre Projects was posting about it. The Belvoir was posting about it. It had popped up in several status updates of friends, too.

 

The name didn’t give much away. But the promo shots spoke volumes. At least they did to me. Now, I’m a keen consumer of the arts and culture, from screens to stages and concert halls to the streets; and I’m a self-defined ‘cultural omnivore’, so my palette thrives on the alternative and diverse, but when a man clearly of ‘Middle-Eastern appearance’ (actor Hazem Shammas) hits my feed accompanied by words like theatreBelvoirSurry Hills and Muslim-Australian, it tweaks my interest in a special kind of way. Read on and you’ll understand why.

 

The Tribe, is a series of vignettes – snap shots in time told through the eyes of the main character, Bani, a young boy growing up in Lakemba,  and second generation Australian. The stories are centred around his experience of family and major life events, and sit at that beautiful confluence – that point where the culture of his ancestors and his experience of growing up in Australia merge.

 

The Tribe tells Bani’s stories – stories that are familiar to many, me included. I know the streets and places described because I’ve been there. Arabic music and language lace the edges of the script, punctuating the stories. This is music and language familiar to me. I know the quirks of family and culture that Bani tells of, intimately. They’re all part of my lived experience growing up Greek-Australian in places like Lakemba, Wiley Park, Carlton and Canley Heights. So to see them all in this context – that is, placed on a stage in a suburb far from their origin for an audience perhaps not so acquainted with them — was a powerful thing.

 

Placing honest, personal stories not often heard on a new and bigger stage like this, adds a legitimacy and confers a new value both to the stories themselves, and to the writers, actors and producers behind them. It offers a doorway into a deeper sense of belonging and acceptance for the people represented by these stories – an embrace into this country’s bigger story.

 

In the words of the writer, Michael Mohammed Ahmad: ‘The Tribe is my attempt to counteract the limited and simplistic representation that the Arab-Australian Muslim community of Western Sydney has received to date, and to offer a broader, more intimate understanding. It is also an act of self-determination – a declaration of the right to reclaim and tell our own stories in our own way.’

 

So in this light, The Tribe, and other works like it, are also powerful anti-racism vehicles. Yes, they are theatre, pure and simple. Yes, they are art and culture.I’m not advocating for an instrumental approach to the arts – to theatre-making in this case. But works like The Tribe are instruments of social cohesion by their very nature. They are stories, faces, music and languages not seen often enough on our screens and stages, where what dominates does not reflect the whole lived reality of the diversity, plurality and inter-sectionality around us.

 

We need more theatre like this! The Tribe runs through til Feb 7thGo see it – no matter where you grew up or if you identify with Bani or not. You’ll be entertained and moved, and you might even come out with a new understanding.

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